Medical History

If a patient has signs or symptoms that may be due to lung cancer, the doctor will examine the patient and take a medical history to check for risk factors and learn more about the symptoms.

As part of the medical history, the doctor will ask about the patient’s background. Questions may include:

  • Past or current illnesses
  • Family history of lung cancer
  • Environmental exposures that may have put the person at risk of lung diseases, including lung cancer. These include living in certain parts of the country where fungal infections or radon exposure are more likely; history of tobacco use; and jobs that might have put the person at risk for lung cancer, like mining or working with heavy metals. This information can also help the doctor figure out which kind of lung cancer a person is most likely to have—the type of lung cancer can influence the treatment choices.

The doctor will also need to know about any new symptoms like cough or shortness of breath, along with others like weight loss, headaches, or leg pain. The doctor will examine the patient to look for signs of disease, such as swollen lymph nodes, decreased breath sounds, or anything else unusual. If the results of the history and physical exam suggest possible lung cancer, additional tests will be done.1

Updated February 26, 2016


References

  1. Pastis N, Bonifazi M, Gasparini S, Silvestri G. Chapter 23: Diagnostic Workup for Suspected Lung Cancer Confined to the Chest. In: Pass HI, Ball D, Scagliotti GV, Eds. The IASLC Multidisciplinary Approach to Thoracic Oncology. Aurora, CO: IASLC Press, 2014: 335-344.

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