COVID-19

The COVID-19 Third Dose and Booster Shot Explained

Editor's Note: Post was updated on 10/21 with new recommendations and authorizations. 

There has been a lot of information recently about COVID-19 boosters and who should get them and when. Here, LUNGevity’s Dr. Amy Moore, a PhD trained virologist and recognized expert on issues at the intersection of COVID-19 and lung cancer, answers some common questions about boosters and who should get them and when.

It’s Time to Get Your Annual Flu Shot

Flu vaccinations are the best way to help protect against the flu. Each year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that everyone 6 months of age and older receive the vaccination. Getting an annual flu shot is particularly important for those who have been affected by lung cancer, including patients, survivors, caregivers, and others who are frequently around a lung cancer patient.

Should Lung Cancer Patients Get Flu Shots?

Editor's Note: This post was originally published in 2019. Updates were made and additional questions answered in 2020.

Flu vaccinations are the best way to help protect against the flu. Each year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that everyone 6 months of age and older receive the vaccination. Getting an annual flu shot is particularly important for those who have been affected by lung cancer, including patients, survivors, caregivers, and others who are frequently around a lung cancer patient.

Q&A with Oncology Nurse Navigator Amy Jo Pixley: COVID-19 and Lung Cancer

LUNGevity’s Chief Health Equity and Diversity Officer Jeanne Regnante sat down with Amy Jo Pixley, an oncology nurse navigator at Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute of Penn Medicine Lancaster General Health, located in Lancaster PA, to discuss COVID-19 and lung cancer tips. This conversation took place in May 2020.

 

Jeanne Regnante: What are some questions you’re hearing that are on the minds of lung cancer patients, based on their need for cancer care during the pandemic?

Should people with lung cancer be concerned about COVID-19 if they are treated with radiotherapy?

On April 28, 2020, a draft of a scientific manuscript was posted on social media that raised concerns in the lung cancer community. The report was from a single radiation oncology department in New York City that identified people who tested positive for COVID-19 and who had received radiotherapy for a variety of cancers.