Lung Cancer Interception Research Awards

LUNGevity is co-funding two first-of-their-kind awards that take a novel approach to finding lung cancer early, when it is most treatable. These research awards focus on lung cancer interception—catching precancerous cells and blocking them from turning into cancer cells. The goal of these interdisciplinary and multi-institutional awards studies is to find noninvasive, widely available diagnostic and early detection tools that will dramatically change outcomes for people with lung cancer.

LUNGevity’s research goal is to find better ways to detect, diagnose, and now intercept lung cancer in its earliest stages. In collaboration with Stand Up To Cancer and American Lung Association’s LUNG FORCE, these awards build on LUNGevity’s eight years of investment in early detection lung cancer research.

The Awards

The SU2C-LUNGevity Foundation-American Lung Association Lung Cancer Interception Dream Team will develop diagnostic tools, such as nasal swabs, blood tests, and radiological imaging, to confirm whether lung abnormalities found on chest imaging are benign lung disease or lung cancer.  To protect against recurrence of disease that has already been successfully treated, new blood tests will help identify patients at the earliest stages of recurrence, enabling timely interventions such as immunotherapy.

  • SU2C-LUNGevity Foundation-American Lung Association Lung Cancer Interception Dream Team: Intercept Lung Cancer Through Immune, Imaging, & Molecular Evaluation (InTIME)
  • Funding: $5 million
  • Leader: Avrum Spira, MD, professor of medicine, pathology and bioinformatics, and director of the Cancer Center at Boston University-Boston Medical Center
  • Co-leader: Steven Dubinett, MD, associate vice chancellor for research at UCLA and director of the lung cancer research program at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center

The SU2C-LUNGevity Foundation-American Lung Association Lung Cancer Interception Translational Research Team will develop a lung cancer interception assay (LCIA) that can be used in conjunction with low-dose CT scans, based on blood-based assays that examine circulating tumor cells and circulating tumor DNA. After completing pilot testing as part of this Translational Research Grant, the team plans to move the LCIA forward to larger, prospective clinical trials.

  • SU2C-LUNGevity-American Lung Association Lung Cancer Interception Translational Research Team: Blood-based Early Interception of Lung Cancer.
  • Funding: $2 million
  • Leader: Lecia Sequist, MD, MPH, associate professor of medicine, and director of the Center for Innovation in Early Cancer Detection (CIECD) at Massachusetts General Hospital. 
  • Co-leader: Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD, assistant professor of radiation oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine

 

Read more about the SU2C-LUNGevity Foundation-American Lung Association Lung Cancer Interception awards.

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