-&gt; Get involved https://www.lungevity.org/ en Patient Gateways: Leading to a New Destination in Lung Cancer Care https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/patient-gateways-leading-to-new-destination-in-lung-cancer-care <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Patient Gateways: Leading to a New Destination in Lung Cancer Care</span> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">Dr. Amy C. Moore, VP, Global Engagement and Patient Partnerships</div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/khaskins" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">khaskins</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 10/27/2021 - 09:30</span> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/blog/public/blog/iStock-1203192990.jpg?itok=MnIc1gDq" width="265" height="177" alt="Two couples at beach" title="Two couples at beach" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-blog" /> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>This week, LUNGevity Foundation is launching a brand-new initiative called <em>Lung Cancer Patient Gateways</em>. The concept is to provide a “one-stop shop” of information and resources for patients and caregivers navigating a lung cancer diagnosis. We will be creating a total of six (6) Patient Gateways, broken out by lung cancer biomarker or subtype, including KRAS, EGFR, ALK, Rare Mutations and Fusions (ROS1, RET, MET, NTRK, BRAF and others), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The KRAS Patient Gateway launches October 27, 2021.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>In working with patients and caregivers over time, we have consistently heard about the need for a comprehensive site that gives patients and caregivers easy access to the things they value the most: up-to-date information about their particular type of lung cancer; the ability to quickly pinpoint where the leading experts are who specialize in treatment of their disease; convenient access to their electronic health record; information on clinical trials; the opportunity to connect with others navigating the same issues and participate in events within the community; timely news on the latest in research advances and other items that may be of interest.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>We were very intentional about the naming of this new resource. “Gateway” is actually defined as “an entry to a place.”  As patients enter the “place” that is lung cancer, our primary goal was for each site to serve as an entry point to guide patients and caregivers in a purposeful way with the tools and information they need to navigate their own lung cancer experience. We felt strongly about putting everything in one place to make it easy to find and easy to use.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>In my role as Vice President of Global Engagement and Patient Partnerships for LUNGevity, I am particularly proud of what we have created and the value it adds for our community. I am especially excited to launch this overall effort with the KRAS Gateway, as it reflects the extraordinary scientific progress that has occurred over the last couple of years. It wasn’t that long ago that KRAS was considered an "undruggable" biomarker, a distinction it had held for over 40 years. But because of research advances, we now have a growing list of drugs that show promise for patients whose cancer is KRAS positive. I don’t know about you, but that fills me with great hope!</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>What I hope you will find as you explore the new Lung Cancer Patient Gateways is a lot of information, a sense of community, and a feeling of empowerment. We want this to be an entry to a new way of thinking about lung cancer, one informed by the latest science, inspired by all the amazing communities that already exist and one driven by some of the latest innovations to bring you what you need when you need it most. We are in this “place” together.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><em>We are grateful to Amgen for sponsoring this new patient resource. </em></span></span></span></p> <p class="text-align-center"><a class="btn btn-secondary" href="https://gateway.lungevity.org/"><span><span><span>Visit the Patient Gateways</span></span></span></a></p> <h3><span><span><span>Related Reading:</span></span></span></h3> <ul> <li><a href="/node/5636">Accepting a Lung Cancer Diagnosis</a></li> <li><a href="/node/5563">Advice from a Long-term Lung Cancer Survivor</a></li> <li><a href="/node/5559">Good News for KRAS Lung Cancer Patient</a></li> </ul> <hr /> <p><img alt="Dr. Amy Moore" class="display-left" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/blog/Amy%20Moore%20headshot.jpg" /><em>Dr. Amy Moore is LUNGevity's VP of Global Engagement and Patient Partnerships and resident expert on issues at the intersection of COVID-19 and lung cancer. Amy is a virologist and cancer researcher with over a decade of experience in the nonprofit sector working on unique initiatives to build research capacity and improve cancer outcomes.</em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog category</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/survivorship" hreflang="en">-&gt; Survivorship</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/get-involved" hreflang="en">-&gt; Get involved</a></div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-comment-node-blog field--type-comment field--label-hidden comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=5702&amp;2=comment_node_blog&amp;3=comment_node_blog" token="ZKJBtYlWVsJ8lZRoRDmLjHS9_-sPvdI651CUMwKY2Ws"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Wed, 27 Oct 2021 14:30:25 +0000 khaskins 5702 at https://www.lungevity.org https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/patient-gateways-leading-to-new-destination-in-lung-cancer-care#comments Meeting Your Legislators: An Advocate’s Experience https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/meeting-your-legislators-advocate%E2%80%99s-experience <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Meeting Your Legislators: An Advocate’s Experience</span> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">Yovana Portillo, lung cancer survivor</div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/khaskins" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">khaskins</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 10/25/2021 - 08:18</span> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/blog/public/blog/YMP-%20Hiking%20Fall%202019_1.jpg?itok=SZKf3GpG" width="250" height="315" alt="Yovana Portillo" title="Yovana Portillo" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-blog" /> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span>The first time I met with my representatives was in Washington, DC in 2018. It was part of a grassroots movement called Life &amp; Breath Rally. We were each paired with another advocate and “cold called” our Congressional representatives, which basically meant we went to the Capitol and knocked on doors. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>The first Congressional representative we spoke to was actually in the hallway of the Capitol. He was the representative of the advocate I was paired with, so I let her do all the talking. He was dismissive of our ask. I ended up writing them a note after I got back home, explaining how disappointing it was to not be heard. They actually responded to my note, which made me feel better about the interaction.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Thankfully, everyone else we spoke to that day was empathetic and accommodating, and it was an empowering feeling. Since then, I have met with many representatives and have never had a negative experience like my first, so don’t let it scare you. For the most part, people are very receptive and interested to hear my story.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>It can be intimidating to meet with your legislators for the first time. Here’s what to expect: generally, you will meet with legislative aides, though sometimes it might be your representative. When meeting, be sure to explain where you live (they will want to confirm you are one of their constituents), what brought you into this meeting today, and why the issue you care about should matter to them. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>This is the story I tell: I was in a car accident, which led to the incidental discovery of a tumor in my lung and my diagnosis of lung cancer. I had a lower left lobectomy within a month of my diagnosis and have been NED (no evidence of disease) ever since. I have been lucky, but many aren’t. I have friends who are in treatment and can’t travel to advocate, so I have to be the voice for them and others still fighting the disease. You can be young, healthy, and active, and still get lung cancer. I am living proof. Please prioritize policy that will benefit those impacted by lung cancer.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>After my meetings, I send handwritten thank you notes (I am old school!) and post about our conversations on social media, tagging them. These measures are important next steps. To me, they say, “Don’t forget me. Don’t forget my story. It’s important.” </span></span></p> <p><span><span>If you are anxious about telling your story, know that is completely normal. When I first started sharing, it was difficult to even say “I have lung cancer” without bawling. However, the more you practice, the better you get. Start with telling your family and friends. They might get bored of hearing it so many times, but the repetition will help you feel more comfortable and natural. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Something that also helped me is putting the experience to scale. Most of the time, these meetings have 1-5 people in them. After I realized this, it felt less like public speaking and more like a conversation. I speak in front of more people as a lector at Sunday Mass. I could definitely do this.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>You can also link up with someone else affected by lung cancer in your area. As they say, there is strength in numbers. When I was paired with another advocate for my first experience in DC, it was also very helpful because she had experience and could show me the ropes of how to do it. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>The first time meeting with your legislators will be nerve-wracking, but you will get better and it will get easier. The biggest thing to remember is that this is your story. No one knows your story better than you. No one can question or rebuke your thoughts, your feelings, or your actions because at the end of the day, it is <em>your</em> story.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>If you are thinking about getting involved in advocacy, then you are ready. Although you might think you will have only a small impact, you really never know the small impact your story might have on others. And those small ripple effects that you will create will be felt regardless of what you choose to share or what area of advocacy you decide is the best fit for you.</span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>I look forward to crossing paths with you, all my fellow advocates, someday.</span></span></span></p> <p class="text-align-center"><span><span><strong><span>Interested in learning more about lung cancer advocacy? We have the tools to help you get started.  Join the </span></strong><a href="https://lungevity.org/for-supporters-advocates/lungevity-action-network"><strong>LUNGevity Action Network </strong></a><strong><span>to take real steps towards improving lives and outcomes for people with lung cancer.</span></strong></span></span></p> <p class="text-align-center"><a class="btn btn-secondary" href="https://action.lungevity.org/"><span><span><strong><span>Join Now</span></strong></span></span></a></p> <h3><span><span><strong><span>Related Reading:</span></strong></span></span></h3> <ul> <li><a href="https://action.lungevity.org/2021/10/tips-successful-legislator-meeting/">Tips for a Successful Legislator Meeting</a></li> <li><a href="/node/5317">Finding My Passion in Lung Cancer Advocacy</a></li> <li><a href="/node/5564">Exercise After Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog category</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/from-community" hreflang="en">From the community</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/survivorship" hreflang="en">-&gt; Survivorship</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/get-involved" hreflang="en">-&gt; Get involved</a></div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-comment-node-blog field--type-comment field--label-hidden comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=5701&amp;2=comment_node_blog&amp;3=comment_node_blog" token="hVLOW0LhQn_RIAJC1FHKHzqYKAEpmDQ_ogx29n8OyVg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 25 Oct 2021 13:18:09 +0000 khaskins 5701 at https://www.lungevity.org https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/meeting-your-legislators-advocate%E2%80%99s-experience#comments November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/november-is-lung-cancer-awareness-month-1 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month</span> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">LUNGevity Foundation</div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/khaskins" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">khaskins</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 10/18/2021 - 10:58</span> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/blog/public/blog/LCAM-Graphic-2020.jpg?itok=d_2_of4S" width="265" height="265" alt="Image of lungs made from lung cancer-related buzzwords" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-blog" /> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span>November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, a time to educate the public about the disease, take action for and raise awareness of lung cancer, and share stories of the people living lung cancer  and their families.   </span></span></p> <p><span><span>LUNGevity is spreading the word this Lung Cancer Awareness Month, and we hope you will join us to make a difference! There are plenty of ways to participate - check out five ideas to get you started below. </span></span></p> <h2><span><span>Stay Up-To-Date </span></span></h2> <p><span><span><span>Get the facts by checking our lung cancer <a href="https://lungevity.org/for-supporters-advocates/lung-cancer-statistics">statistics</a>, reading our <a href="https://lungevity.org/news-blogs/blogs">online blogs</a><span class="MsoHyperlink"><span>,</span></span> and  <a href="www.lungevity.org/get-latest-news-in-your-inbox">signing up</a> to get periodic emails from LUNGevity with the latest news delivered straight to your inbox.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>When you arm yourself with the latest information about lung cancer research and treatment, you’ll be prepared whenever the opportunity arises to share facts, compelling stories, and ways to make a difference.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span><span>Employ the Power of Social Media </span></span></h2> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Do you follow LUNGevity on social media? LUNGevity posts regularly to keep our followers in-the-know about what’s happening at the Foundation and in advancements for people living with lung cancer. You’ll find blogs, videos, inspiration posts, and trending lung cancer news on our social media accounts. Follow us @LUNGevity and join in the conversation by liking, commenting, and sharing our posts to help spread the message.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Want to engage your social network in the conversation? You can start the conversation by updating your Facebook profile picture to our </span></span><a href="http://www.facebook.com/profilepicframes/?selected_overlay_id=490288701332731"><span><span>#LCAM frame</span></span></a><span><span>. LUNGevity also has </span></span><a href="https://www.lungevity.org/lcam-2021-social-media-toolkit"><span><span>pre-written posts and graphics</span></span></a><span><span> that you can share on your own feed to help your community learn the facts about lung cancer. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span>Finally, you can join in our newest movement – KNOWvember, part of the <a href="https://www.lungevity.org/noonemissed">No One Missed</a> campaign. Share your biomarker testing story on social media using #KnowYourBiomarker to help spread awareness about comprehensive biomarker testing for non-small cell lung cancer patients. </span></span></p> <h2><span><span><span>Get to Know Your Legislators </span></span></span></h2> <p><span><span>Set up an appointment to speak with your legislators virtually or in-person to tell them your story and explain why lung cancer should be a national priority. A relationship with your legislation will be beneficial in the future when legislation that may impact you is proposed. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>All perspectives are valuable for legislator to hear. Whether you are a lung cancer survivor, a caregiver, or a healthcare practitioner, your voice and experience matters and can be effective in getting legislators to pay attention to policy issues impacting people with lung cancer. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Not sure who your legislators are? The <a href="https://action.lungevity.org/">LUNGevity Action Network</a> will help you identify your federal legislators and makes it easy to reach out. </span></span></p> <h2><span><span>Raise Vital Funds </span></span></h2> <p><span><span><span><span><span>The good news: we have seen unprecedented advancements in diagnosing and treating lung cancer in the last few years. The better news: we can continue this momentum by supporting more lung cancer research. With more funds and strategic investment in research, we can ensure those affected by lung cancer have the same promise as other cancers. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>There are an infinite number of ways to raise funds for LUNGevity to support lung cancer research, education, and support programs! </span></span><span><span>You can walk with us at <a href="https://lungevity.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=cms.page&amp;id=1859">Breathe Deep TOGETHER</a> on November 6 to raise awareness and funds. </span></span><span><span>If completing an endurance event is on your bucket list, </span></span><a href="https://lungevity.org/events/team-lungevity-endurance-events"><span><span>join</span></span></a><span><span> Team LUNGevity and cross the finish line on behalf of everyone impacted by lung cancer. </span></span><span><span>You can also create your own fundraiser through </span></span><a href="https://lungevity.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.event&amp;eventID=546"><span><span>LUNGevity’s DIY Events Program</span></span></a><span><span><span>. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span><span>Connect with Others Affected by Lung Cancer </span></span></h2> <p><span><span>Whether you are new to your diagnosis or have been navigating the disease for many years, you can find encouragement this Lung Cancer Awareness Month by connecting with others who have been impacted by lung cancer.  </span></span></p> <p><span><span>LUNGevity hosts weekly <a href="/node/5599">Virtual Meetups</a> for patients, survivors, and caregivers to virtually connect face-to-face with others across the country. Join us for conversations about shared experiences, discussions about pressing topics in the community, and a new network of support. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Give support to someone who needs it by becoming a LifeLine mentor! <a href="https://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/support-services/peer-to-peer-mentoring/lungevity-lifeline">LifeLine Support Partners</a> are volunteer mentors who offer encouragement, advice, experience, and hope to those newly diagnosed and anyone needing additional support through a one-on-one personal connection by email or telephone. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>LUNGevity also offers a variety of online communities, from private Facebook groups to an online message board, that provide support, information, and friends by peers impacted by lung cancer. Check out our <a href="https://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/support-services/online-communities">online communities</a> on our website.</span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><span><span><strong>Never underestimate the difference one person can make. </strong>Whether you are spreading awareness about lung cancer in your community and online, raising invaluable funds for lung cancer research and programs, or connecting with someone who needs your support and encouragement, you have an important role this Lung Cancer Awareness Month. Thank you for joining us in this fight against lung cancer.</span></span></span><br />  </p> <p class="text-align-center"><img alt="Five women pointing at camera" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/blog/LCAM%20image%20idea%201.jpg" /></p> <h3><span><span>Other Resources:</span></span></h3> <ul> <li><span><span><a href="https://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/lung-cancer-101">Lung Cancer 101</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span><a href="https://lungevity.org/for-supporters-advocates/lung-cancer-statistics">Lung Cancer Statistics</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span><a href="https://lungevity.org/for-supporters-advocates/support-our-work">Support Our Work</a> </span></span></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog category</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/from-community" hreflang="en">From the community</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/get-involved" hreflang="en">-&gt; Get involved</a></div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-comment-node-blog field--type-comment field--label-hidden comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=5698&amp;2=comment_node_blog&amp;3=comment_node_blog" token="dErGfRvQXA8XKgd3grwDZVhPA4zKhKzIMz8BTQskKDs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 18 Oct 2021 15:58:16 +0000 khaskins 5698 at https://www.lungevity.org https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/november-is-lung-cancer-awareness-month-1#comments Find Your Tribe https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/find-your-tribe <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Find Your Tribe </span> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">Lou Torres, Lung Cancer Survivor</div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/khaskins" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">khaskins</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 10/12/2021 - 13:13</span> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/blog/public/blog/Lou_Torres_1.jpg?itok=Z3p44iOu" width="265" height="241" alt="Lou Torres" title="Lou Torres" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-blog" /> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span>I used to think support groups were for weak people. Then, I found LUNGevity and <a href="/node/69">Lung Cancer Support Community</a> – boy, did that change my mind. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>I discovered LUNGevity’s message board, Lung Cancer Support Community (LCSC), right after they found a rapidly growing nodule in my right lung. At the time, I had just retired early to be a full-time caregiver for my wife, who was in advanced stages of dementia, and I already felt mentally strained. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>When I found out about the nodule, the news sent me to a dark place. Both my parents and many of my aunts and uncles on my mother’s side had died of cancer, so I was prepared for the graveyard. My immediate thought was not about fighting the cancer, but about figuring out who would take care of my wife when I was gone. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>I did a little online research, which – frankly – either makes you more confused or more afraid, and stumbled upon LUNGevity. At first, I smirked at the name. <em>Nice play on words</em>, I thought, <em>but there’s nothing long about living with lung cancer</em>. I quickly glanced at a few posts but didn’t stay long. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>A few nights later, I was laying bed, unable to sleep with no one to talk to. I went back to LCSC and really started reading the posts in the forum. I couldn’t stop. I read about other people’s journeys with lung cancer. I saw those who had been living with the disease for a while, helping those newly diagnosed. It was amazing to hear these stories and see how supportive these people were of each other. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>The more I read, the more it felt like I knew these people who were posting – Curt, LexieCat, Bridget O and Eric. All of these people were going through what I was, but they were talking like they’ve “got this.” I couldn’t help but think, <em>what am I missing?</em></span></span></p> <p><span><span>I waited awhile before I joined in the conversation. It was a few months after they found the nodule and my doctor told me that there was only a 10% chance it would be benign with the rate that it was growing. What I heard was there was a 90% chance they’d remove my lung. Even though my doctor clarified they’d just remove a single lobe of my right lung, only about 15% of my lung capacity, I was still terrified. I truly believed that before the year was out, I would be dead.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>This is when I made my first post. I explained my story and how I was feeling. It turned out others in the group were going through the exact same thing I was. They too<strong> </strong>were scared after their diagnosis<strong> </strong>and somehow that reduced my own fear<strong>. </strong>They were also incredibly knowledgeable. They led me through the full diagnostic process. They gave me questions to ask my medical team. They helped me better understand what my doctor was telling me. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>I started to think maybe this wouldn’t be the end. Speaking with these people, hearing their stories, made my thoughts change from “I’m as good as dead” to “How can I increase my workout by 25% to help myself recover more quickly after surgery?” These people brought me back to reality that I could live after lung cancer.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>I had a lobectomy<strong> </strong>later that spring. Because of the group, I knew what to expect during the procedure. I knew what a chest tube would feel like. I knew I needed to buy a wedge pillow in order to sleep at night. I knew how to get myself going in rehab. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Luckily, the surgery was a success, and I have been NED (no evidence of disease) since. I still have annual scans, but thankfully they have<strong> </strong>remained clear. Even though I’m NED, I stay connected to LCSC, and recently became a moderator<strong> </strong>on the message boards. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>This community is my tribe. Even though I haven’t met them in person, they feel like family. There’s an old expression, “You can’t pick your family.” Which I suppose is true of blood relatives, but not true here. And unlike my real family, there is no one I wouldn’t want to eat Thanksgiving dinner with in this community.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>If someone is having a hard time or trying a new treatment, I am on the edge of my seat waiting to hear updates. When I hear someone is doing well, it feels amazing. There are people in this community that have gone through hell, but they’re alive and they’re living a good life. That gives me an incredible amount of hope. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>If you are newly diagnosed, the biggest piece of advice I could give you is to find your tribe. Get a group of people around you that can support you and take care of you. You may have a great family and friend support network, but you also need your lung cancer support group, people who have been through what you’re going through and can prepare you for what to expect and how to navigate this new journey you’re on. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Being a part<strong> </strong>of LCSC changed my life. When I was diagnosed, I was sure that<strong> </strong>was the end, but this group not only taught me how to live with lung cancer but made me want to live. </span></span></p> <p><span><span><img alt="Lou Torres's HOPE tattoo" class="display-left" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/blog/Lou_Torres_Tattoo.jpg" />I always told my kids that they shouldn’t mess up their body with tattoos. But last year, I ignored my own advice and got a HOPE<strong> </strong>tattoo based on LUNGevity’s HOPE Summit logo. This word has become central to my life and I wanted it to be part of me as well.   </span></span></p> <p><span><span>I don’t know if I’ll live one year, 5 years, maybe 10 years, but between now and then, I will do all I can to help others. My life has become less about surviving and more about leaving a mark. I just want to know I’ve done the best I could to help people. As corny as it sounds, that’s it. That’s my hope. </span></span></p> <p> </p> <h3><span><span>Related Reading:</span></span></h3> <ul> <li><a href="/node/5328">Resource Highlight: Lung Cancer Support Community</a></li> <li><a href="/node/5564">Exercise After Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery</a></li> <li> <p><a href="/node/5683">Managing Your Mental Health with Cancer</a></p> </li> </ul> <hr /> <p><span><em>Lou Torres is a retired executive and former musician who discovered he had stage 1 lung cancer in 2019 through an incidental CT scan for another issue.  Shortly after his diagnosis, Lou connected with the LUNGevity site and the Lung Cancer Support Community.  He felt that sharing his story and learnings could be helpful to others and so a year after joining, Lou became one of the Moderators for the forums.  Lou spends time overseeing his wife’s care, being of service to various groups as well as composing and recording music.  He lives with his two Wheaten Terriers, which keep him busy.</em></span></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog category</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/from-community" hreflang="en">From the community</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/survivorship" hreflang="en">-&gt; Survivorship</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/survivor-stories" hreflang="en">-&gt;Survivor stories</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/get-involved" hreflang="en">-&gt; Get involved</a></div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-comment-node-blog field--type-comment field--label-hidden comment-wrapper"> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1963" class="comment js-comment by-anonymous"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1637012105"></mark> <footer class="comment__meta"> <p class="comment__submitted">Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lenny “ Blue”</span> on Sun, 11/14/2021 - 10:28</p> <a href="/comment/1963#comment-1963" hreflang="en">Permalink</a> </footer> <div class="content"> <h3><a href="/comment/1963#comment-1963" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Lou. Thanks for sharing…</a></h3> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Lou.<br /> Thanks for sharing your story and how you went from “ nope to hope”. I can relate to your story all to well. Yes, I feel like family with the people I’ve met through Lungevity like you. Thank you for your inspiring words!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1963&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RL-sMj2ceNsqN4O4I9n4KNLQ8CUF9Gid802ePJ_tc-8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </article> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=5691&amp;2=comment_node_blog&amp;3=comment_node_blog" token="kQpHVKLC3zvATGwor44TBeX2p-DoJG9TdC1joY_MP2A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 12 Oct 2021 18:13:44 +0000 khaskins 5691 at https://www.lungevity.org https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/find-your-tribe#comments Let’s walk TOGETHER for lung cancer this fall! https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/let%E2%80%99s-walk-together-for-lung-cancer-this-fall <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Let’s walk TOGETHER for lung cancer this fall!</span> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">Heather Doran, LUNGevity’s Senior Development Manager </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/khaskins" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">khaskins</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 10/06/2021 - 13:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/blog/public/blog/Heather-Doran-and-Lola.jpg?itok=aZeXK9ZU" width="236" height="315" alt="Heather Doran with dog Lola" title="Heather Doran with dog Lola" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-blog" /> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><a href="http://www.LUNGevity.org/together">Breathe Deep TOGETHER</a>, LUNGevity’s nationwide walk, is back this fall! Join the entire Breathe Deep community on November 6th<strong> </strong>to help stop lung cancer.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Tune into our live broadcast at <strong>10 a.m. ET <span><span> </span></span>on November 6 </strong>with participants from across the country! This hour-long broadcast will stream through the Charge Running app and feature survivor stories, messages from sponsors, live shout-outs from the walk, updates on what is happening at LUNGevity – all while you walk! In addition to the broadcast, you will be able to track your miles, snap photos and exchange messages with other walkers in the group chat feature! You might even hear your name called out as you cross the 5K “finish line”!</span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>We will also have two in-person events occurring simultaneously: Breathe Deep Boston and Breathe Deep NYC, both on November 6! If you live locally, we are so excited to see you in person!</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span>This year marks 20 years of LUNGevity events and we cannot wait to celebrate TOGETHER. Still not sure if Breathe Deep TOGETHER is for you? Read our six reasons why you should participate this fall.  </span></span></p> <h3><span><span>1. Celebrate LCAM with us! </span></span></h3> <p><span><span>November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, and we can’t wait to kick it off with this nationwide walk! What better way to spread awareness about lung cancer than to have participants walking all across the country (and beyond!) in their Breathe Deep gear (or favorite blue clothing)! </span></span></p> <h3><span><span>2. Walk in honor or in memory of your loved one! </span></span></h3> <p><span><span>As of October 10, we have 167 <span>teams </span>signed up to walk on the morning of November 6th, all who have been impacted by lung cancer in some way. </span></span></p> <h3><span><span>3. Connect with fellow lung cancer survivors and caregivers! </span></span></h3> <p><span><span>Whether you are joining us at one of our in-person events or tuning in to our live broadcast from your neighborhood, you will have the opportunity to connect with participants from across the country (and within your community) that are on this journey with you! </span></span></p> <h3><span><span>4. Raise money for lung cancer! </span></span></h3> <p><span><span>We have come a long way in the 20 years since our first event took place (happy anniversary to us!), and we are hopeful for the future of those impacted by lung cancer. We continue to walk each year and raise funds so we can change the outcomes for people living with lung cancer through research, education and support. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>BONUS: In addition to raising funds for critical research, you can also earn fun <a href="https://assets.donordrive.com/lungevity/files/$cms$/100/5744.pdf">LUNGevity swag</a> along the way, from a t-shirt to a cooler! </span></span></p> <h3><span><span>5. Spread awareness! </span></span></h3> <p><span><span>From the moment you sign up, we provide you with ways to help spread the word about LUNGevity, the walk and our important work - from updating your fundraising page with your personal story and sharing on social media to getting out in your neighborhood!</span></span></p> <p><span><span>We also encourage our walkers to join the <a href="/node/5275">LUNGevity Action Network </a>and learn what you can do to be an advocate in your community. </span></span></p> <h3><span><span>6. Team up to make an impact! </span></span></h3> <p><span><span>Breathe Deep TOGETHER is perfect for friends, family, colleagues, and even acquaintances to come together! We provide you with a team captain guide, fundraising guide, and fun ways to connect in-person or virtually as you work to raise funds and awareness as a TEAM! </span></span></p> <p><span><span>You won’t want to miss this impactful morning of celebration, hope, and remembrance. Register as an individual, team, or company today! Have questions? Send an email to <a href="mailto:hdoran@lungevity.org">hdoran@lungevity.org</a> and we can help you get started! </span></span></p> <p class="text-align-center"><span><span><a class="btn btn-secondary" href="http://www.LUNGevity.org/together">Register</a>  </span></span></p> <p class="text-align-center"><img alt="Family Walking Breathe Deep TOGETHER 2020" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/blog/Family-Walking-BDT.jpg" /></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog category</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/from-community" hreflang="en">From the community</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/get-involved" hreflang="en">-&gt; Get involved</a></div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-comment-node-blog field--type-comment field--label-hidden comment-wrapper"> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-1946" class="comment js-comment by-anonymous"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1634047190"></mark> <footer class="comment__meta"> <p class="comment__submitted">Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mary Shipman</span> on Sat, 10/09/2021 - 12:58</p> <a href="/comment/1946#comment-1946" hreflang="en">Permalink</a> </footer> <div class="content"> <h3><a href="/comment/1946#comment-1946" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">We all need Hope!</a></h3> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>We all need Hope!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1946&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FuJ7sR7NRDHux35a8o8QYrmzYpSYqJsugp8LkKFWTWc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </article> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=5684&amp;2=comment_node_blog&amp;3=comment_node_blog" token="hxKgXlfFZJws-yDTaKZGytlSLWlYaHKUtHDzfcoVKcM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Wed, 06 Oct 2021 18:44:02 +0000 khaskins 5684 at https://www.lungevity.org https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/let%E2%80%99s-walk-together-for-lung-cancer-this-fall#comments Fundraiser Spotlight: JC Memorial Golf Outing - Fore the Cure https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/fundraiser-spotlight-jc-memorial-golf-outing-fore-cure <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Fundraiser Spotlight: JC Memorial Golf Outing - Fore the Cure</span> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">LUNGevity Foundation</div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/khaskins" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">khaskins</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 09/08/2021 - 12:02</span> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/blog/public/blog/JC%20Memorial%20Golf%20Outing%20Crew.PNG?itok=p-mlXgKI" width="265" height="292" alt="JC Memorial Golf Outing team" title="JC Memorial Golf Outing team" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-blog" /> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span>After their childhood friend Jordan Christie was diagnosed with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer at the age of 25, friends Kyle, Jessica, Colin, Matt, Kellie, Julie, and Mike wanted to help. They saw first-hand how difficult living with lung cancer could be. The friends knew they could have an impact by raising money to help fund the two things that helped Jordan the most: new treatments and support programs. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>“Matt and I were living with Jordan when he was diagnosed,” explained Mike. “Watching the slow progression of the disease was tough. However, we also saw how new medicines bought Jordan time and improved his quality of life. These treatments gave him a few more great years that we were able to spend together.”</span></span></p> <p><span><span>“The online community is so powerful,” Jessica says of the LUNGevity <a href="/node/68">private Facebook group</a> that Jordan joined to get support and find community. “He was able to talk to people going through what he was going through and vent and get advice. For example, he was so strict with his diet, but someone else in the group encouraged him to loosen up and still enjoy life while going through treatment. This advice helped Jordan.”</span></span></p> <p><span><span>The group for his specific type of lung cancer, ALK+. This community included people who had been living their lives with lung cancer for 10 and sometimes even 15 years, which gave Jordan and his friends hope. “Even though the situation felt at times hopeless, especially when Jordan was first diagnosed, the community was so important to help us all stay positive,” Julie says. “It was so reassuring to just know the group was there if we needed them.”</span></span></p> <p><span><span>The friends’ first event to raise money was a bowling tournament, organized by Kellie. Some of the proceeds helped Jordan cover his bills and others went to LUNGevity. They choose to support LUNGevity because they were impressed with the research program and because Jordan had such a positive experience on the private Facebook group. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>After Jordan unfortunately passed away, they wanted to give back to the community and continue to raise money to fund more research and resources to help people like Jordan.  They also wanted to honor Jordan’s memory, and they did it in the way that he would most appreciate: a golf outing. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Golf, both watching and playing it, was important to Jordan after college. “Even when the treatments took a toll on his body and he couldn’t play as much or eventually at all, he still joined us on the course,” explained Matt. “When we were brainstorming ideas for how to raise money in his memory, it was the obvious choice.”</span></span></p> <p><span><span>They picked their hometown course in Mount Olive, New Jersey and hosted the event on Jordan’s birthday, July 17. They called the event the JC Memorial Golf Outing – Fore the Cure; JC for Jordan Christie. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>They had no idea what to expect, but the event ended up being a huge success. People came from all over the country, even from as far as California. They far exceeded their initial goal of $10,000, raising $11,000 on event day alone, with even more funds matched by a sponsor. </span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The golf outing was a tournament with prizes such as free rounds of golf or gift cards to the golf shop. They also had a silent auction, with dozens of baskets with items and gift cards, and a 50/50 raffle. A high school friend won the 50/50 raffle, which amounted to more than $1,000, and he choose to donate his winnings back to the event, which touched Jordan’s friends and emphasized how important Jordan was to their community.  </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span>The JC Memorial Golf Outing team has big goals for next year. They want the event to get bigger and better, at a nicer course with more prizes and other activities. Kellie says, “Our goal is for nobody, no friend group, and no family to ever have to go through something like this again.” They hope to still be hosting a version of the event a decade from now and continuing to raise funds to make their goal a reality. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>“While we hope one day they’ll find a cure, we know the importance of even one more year,” says Matt. “Jordan would often say, ‘If I could just buy a little more time, they’ll have better medicine and treatments.’ It didn’t work out for Jordan, but down the line, it can help someone else. We want to raise money to help others in our position.”</span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>For those interested in hosting a similar event, Kyle advises, “Don’t hesitate to reach out to other people who have done similar events to learn best practices and get tips. Don’t be afraid to ask others for help; you might be surprised how many will agree or have connections that could make the event even better. Ultimately, as long as your heart and intentions are in the right place, people will know that and want to help.” </span></span></span></p> <p> </p> <p class="text-align-center"><span><span><strong>Are you considering hosting a similar event? Learn how you can get involved with <a href="https://lungevity.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.event&amp;eventID=546">LUNGevity’s DIY events</a>.</strong></span></span><br />  </p> <h3><span><span><strong>Related Reading:</strong></span></span></h3> <ul> <li><a href="/node/1489">LUNGevity Events</a></li> <li><a href="/node/68">LUNGevity Online Communities</a></li> <li> <p><a href="/node/5566">Running a Half-Ironman as a Lung Cancer Survivor</a></p> </li> </ul> <hr /> <p><strong><img alt="Spotlight logo" class="display-left" data-align="left" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/blog/spotlight_logo-150.png" />LUNGevity Spotlight</strong> is a way to highlight people living with lung cancer, caregivers, volunteers, and fundraisers who are making a positive impact in the LUNGevity community. We hope that their stories will inspire and encourage many more to get involved.</p> <p>If you know someone in the LUNGevity community whom you'd like us to Spotlight, please <a href="https://lungevity.org/spotlight-nomination-form">nominate them here</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog category</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/from-community" hreflang="en">From the community</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/get-involved" hreflang="en">-&gt; Get involved</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/spotlight" hreflang="en">Spotlight</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/fundraiser-spotlight" hreflang="en">-&gt; Fundraiser spotlight</a></div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-comment-node-blog field--type-comment field--label-hidden comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=5641&amp;2=comment_node_blog&amp;3=comment_node_blog" token="ILAWV9KkgaL6XkQgRijKLjytH4wkDsMJSpeSKTdTgrA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Wed, 08 Sep 2021 17:02:36 +0000 khaskins 5641 at https://www.lungevity.org https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/fundraiser-spotlight-jc-memorial-golf-outing-fore-cure#comments Running a Half-Ironman as a Lung Cancer Survivor https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/running-half-ironman-as-lung-cancer-survivor <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Running a Half-Ironman as a Lung Cancer Survivor </span> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">Marie Bahno, Lung Cancer Survivor</div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/khaskins" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">khaskins</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 07/20/2021 - 11:33</span> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/blog/public/blog/Marie_Bahno_running.jpg?itok=UrfUAhG3" width="253" height="315" alt="Marie Bahno" title="Marie Bahno" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-blog" /> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The day before my lung biopsy, May 18, 2020, I ran 7 miles. As I was running, I couldn’t help but think there is no way I have lung cancer. Yet, when the results of my biopsy came back, that’s exactly what I was diagnosed with: stage I adenocarcinoma non-small cell lung cancer. </p> <p>It’s rare to be diagnosed as stage I; in fact, only about 18% of people are. That’s why I call it my “incidentally-noma,” a little joke as a retired nurse about my lung cancer being found completely by accident. </p> <p>About a year before I was diagnosed, I had pretty bad food poisoning. I couldn’t stop vomiting and passing out. Nothing was helping, so they did an MRI and found a brain tumor. I had a craniotomy to remove the tumor. Thank God it was a benign meningioma. However, in the process of all that, they also saw a spot on my lung. </p> <p>My mom was a heavy smoker, and she died from lung cancer at a very early age.  Because of that, and just general stigma around lung cancer, I had the mentality that only people who smoke get lung cancer. I’m athletic and I don’t smoke, so lung cancer was the farthest thing in my mind. Now, I know anyone with lungs can get lung cancer. I’m still a little leery telling other people that my cancer is lung cancer because people can be naïve, but try my best to educate others that lung cancer is not a smoker’s disease. </p> <p>I’m fortunate they found it as early as they did. Because I was stage I, they were able to treat my cancer through surgery only. They removed my right lower lobe via VATs, along with 34 lymph nodes that all came back negative for cancer. </p> <p>Prior to my diagnosis, I was very active. I had run the New York City Marathon in 2017 and 2018. After I was diagnosed and found out I would have to remove a part of my lung, I wasn’t sure I would be able to run again; after all, my surgeon was removing 25% of my lung capacity. However, she explained to me that the human body is an amazing machine and that the other two lobes would expand and take up the area where the other lobe was removed. She told me: “You will be able to run again.”</p> <p>She was right. About a month after surgery, I started to run again. The only reason I waited so long was because the incisions from the surgery made wearing a sports bra too uncomfortable. </p> <p>Besides the incision sites, which were tender and sore, the only thing that bothered me about running after surgery was the humidity. It made it a little tougher to take deep breathes. My surgeon says this is normal and should improve with time. </p> <p>Prior to my diagnosis, in 2020, I decided I would do a Half- Ironman in honor of turning 60 years old. A Half-Ironman is a long-distance triathlon consisting of a 1.2 mile swim, followed by a 56 mile bike ride, and a 13.1 mile run. It felt momentous enough for a milestone birthday like 60. </p> <p>However, the pandemic hit and the event was cancelled and then they found my lung cancer. I wasn’t sure I would still be able to do something like a Half-Ironman, even though my surgeon had assured me I should regain lung capacity. My biggest fear is that I would be too slow as every segment (the swim, the bike, the run) is time capped, and I worried I wouldn’t finish within the allotted time. </p> <p>My wife gave me great advice. She said, “When you’re out there and have doubts, just look around. Look at where you are, look what you have been able to do. Nothing has stopped you yet.” This was a light bulb moment for me. I realized I’m here, and I’m attempting to do this. If I don’t finish, then I don’t finish, but at least I started.</p> <p>I finished. In fact, I even felt really good while competing. It did get pretty hot and humid towards the end, and I ran a lot slower than I would’ve if I were just running a half marathon. But I felt so blessed to even be at the event, that when I was coming into the last mile, I got teary eyed. </p> <p>Now, I am training for the Marine Corps Marathon, which happens every year in October in Washington, DC. I’m aiming to beat my New York City marathon time. </p> <p>When I was first diagnosed, I didn’t know I was stage I. All I knew was that I had cancer. When you hear “cancer,” you feel as though you’re a ticking time bomb. Once I knew it was stage I, I felt relieved. However, now, I experience some survivors’ guilt.  I’m thankful that I was able to have surgery and live a normal life now, but feel strange sharing my positive news or accomplishments with other survivors who have to go through things a lot worse than what I went through. </p> <p>I also worry with every repeat scans that it could come back, or some new tumors might pop up. Through this process, I’ve gotten closer to God. I grew up Catholic, but got away from the Church as an adult. Lately, I’ve been reading the Bible and listening to a local Christian radio station. They play a lot of spiritual music, and that has really helped me find peace. Whatever is going to happen, I know it’s in God’s hands now. </p> <p>If you are newly diagnosed with lung cancer, just know that lung cancer is not a death sentence, whether you are stage I or stage IV. You just have to keep fighting, stay positive, and put your faith in God. </p> <p class="text-align-center"><em><a href="/node/1486">Team LUNGevity</a>, our endurance events program, is gearing up for in-person races this fall, and you’re invited to run with us!  </em></p> <p class="text-align-center"><a class="text-button" href="/node/1486">Run with LUNGevity</a></p> <h3>Related Reading:</h3> <ul> <li> <p><a href="/node/5564">Exercise after Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery</a></p> </li> <li> <p><a href="/node/5323">Advances in Surgery for Lung Cancer</a></p> </li> <li> <p><a href="Marathon Training During COVID-19">Marathon Training During COVID-19</a></p> </li> </ul> <hr /> <p><img alt="Marie Bahno with her grandson" class="display-left" data-align="left" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/blog/Marie-Bahno_with_Grandson.png" />Although very active, Marie did not discover the LOVE for running until she was 50. It was at that time that she committed to running 50 races in a year. He 50th race was her very first half marathon. She hasn't looked back since.</p> <p>Marie is a retired school nurse who currently lives in Ocean Pines Maryland with her wife and their pets. They have 1 son and a grandson. She treasures her time with her family, especially her grandson. When she's not training for an event, she enjoys the beach, boating &amp; traveling.</p> <p>Marie shares her story to encourage and inspire others diagnosed with lung cancer to never give up, shoot for the stars, and live life to the fullest.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog category</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/from-community" hreflang="en">From the community</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/survivorship" hreflang="en">-&gt; Survivorship</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/survivor-stories" hreflang="en">-&gt;Survivor stories</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/get-involved" hreflang="en">-&gt; Get involved</a></div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-comment-node-blog field--type-comment field--label-hidden comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=5566&amp;2=comment_node_blog&amp;3=comment_node_blog" token="6LHTpOCiSIx1ErRZcJKSzt8thNTo9jvc1DJ5b0QM7yo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 20 Jul 2021 16:33:31 +0000 khaskins 5566 at https://www.lungevity.org https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/running-half-ironman-as-lung-cancer-survivor#comments May is Lung Cancer Hope Month https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/may-is-lung-cancer-hope-month-0 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">May is Lung Cancer Hope Month</span> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">LUNGevity Foundation </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/gyre" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">gyre</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 04/30/2021 - 17:50</span> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/blog/public/blog/May-LungCancerMonth-ver2_0.jpg?itok=ebB_ZC3Z" width="265" height="265" alt="Lung Cancer Hope Month graphic" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-blog" /> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>LUNGevity established May as Lung Cancer Hope Month to celebrate the incredible strides in research and survivorship for the lung cancer community. Each year, we have more reasons to be hopeful—more treatments are being approved, more people are being diagnosed earlier, the community of advocates is growing stronger, and many people are living longer and better with the disease.</p> <p>We are so fortunate that there is so much progress to celebrate in lung cancer. YOU can get involved and help us celebrate this Lung Cancer Hope Month. Check out some ideas here! We hope you’ll join us in this celebration of progress and hope.<br />  </p> <h2><strong>Spread the word</strong></h2> <p>What better way to celebrate lung cancer and spread hope than sharing with your social media network. You can help drive momentum by posting about the many reasons we have to celebrate this Hope Month with your friends and family on your own social media channels. We make it easy for you by providing language options for posting across your favorite social media platforms, along with images that make your posts pop. Don’t forget to tag LUNGevity!</p> <p>Check out our <a href="https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wpjj2ofba4dhjaj/AAA056c9RPx82VqAG2IU8zSxa?dl=0">social media toolkit </a>and start spreading the word!  </p> <h2><strong>Share your story</strong></h2> <p>Whether you are a patient, survivor, caregiver, scientist, healthcare provider, volunteer, or any of the other important roles in the lung cancer community, you have a story to tell. Share your lung cancer stories of progress, celebration, and hope on our <a href="https://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/blogs/share-your-story">website</a> to inspire others and spread hope of a better tomorrow.</p> <p>Think someone you know has a good story to tell? Nominate them to share their story through <a href="https://lungevity.org/spotlight-nomination-form">LUNGevity Spotlight</a>.<br />  </p> <h2><strong>Put your passion to purpose</strong></h2> <p>This Hope Month, you can turn any activity or occasion into an opportunity to raise funds and awareness for lung cancer. LUNGevity has two opportunities for you to use your interests and activities to honor your commitment to create meaningful change for lung cancer patients and families.</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://lungevity.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.event&amp;eventID=966"><strong>e<em>RACE </em>Lung Cancer</strong></a> is a month-long activity challenge that brings together runners, swimmers, cyclists, and other participants from across the country with one common goal: to <em>erase</em> lung cancer.  Log your miles from your favorite activity during the whole month of May.</li> <li><a href="https://lungevity.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.eventGroup&amp;eventGroupID=4717AF0B-B438-166F-84BAE2A9414DFB3A"><strong>Breathe Deep Your Way</strong></a> is a do-it-yourself campaign for activities and occasions of all types. It’s a great opportunity to showcase your talents or hobbies, celebrate a milestone, or honor a loved one!  </li> </ul> <p><a href="https://lungevity.org/events">Sign up</a> today! <br />  </p> <div> <div> <div> <h2><strong>Get or give hope</strong></h2> <p>Connect with others who have been impacted by lung cancer to get or give hope.  LUNGevity offers a variety of ways to connect, inspire, and encourage others, from <a href="https://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/support-services/online-communities">online communities</a>, like private Facebook groups to an online message board, and weekly <a href="https://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/support-services/virtual-meetups-for-lung-cancer-patients-survivors-and">Virtual Meet-ups</a>, that let patients, survivors, and caregivers to virtually connect face-to-face with others across the country. <a href="https://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/support-services">Find</a> your connection of hope today.<br />  </p> <h2><strong>Become a lung cancer advocate </strong></h2> <p>Want to see progress in lung cancer continue and for there to be more reasons to celebrate in the future?  Become an advocate for lung cancer through the LUNGevity Action Network. The LUNGevity Action Network gives you the tools and resources you need to amplify your voice to help change lung cancer.  Whether you have 15 minutes or a few hours to spare, you can make a difference today! Learn more and sign up at <a href="https://action.lungevity.org/">action.lungevity.org</a>.</p> <p>LUNGevity has lots of ways for you to celebrate and get involved this May—find one that works for you. Thank you for helping spread the word about the hope in lung cancer and celebrating this important and inspiring month with us!</p> <p> </p> <h3>Other Resources:</h3> <ul> <li> <p><a href="https://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/lung-cancer-101">Lung Cancer 101</a></p> </li> <li> <p><a href="https://lungevity.org/for-supporters-advocates/lung-cancer-statistics">Lung Cancer Statistics</a></p> </li> <li> <p><a href="https://lungevity.org/for-supporters-advocates/support-our-work">Support Our Work</a></p> </li> </ul> <p> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog category</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/from-community" hreflang="en">From the community</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/get-involved" hreflang="en">-&gt; Get involved</a></div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-comment-node-blog field--type-comment field--label-hidden comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=5539&amp;2=comment_node_blog&amp;3=comment_node_blog" token="JKzuhEaSGpYcv2wAJXFfEuzBmCsK4PkGhZa1rE3-FlI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 30 Apr 2021 22:50:36 +0000 gyre 5539 at https://www.lungevity.org https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/may-is-lung-cancer-hope-month-0#comments Finding My Passion in Lung Cancer Advocacy https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/finding-my-passion-in-lung-cancer-advocacy <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Finding My Passion in Lung Cancer Advocacy</span> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">Ros Miller, Lung Cancer Caregiver &amp; Advocate </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/khaskins" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">khaskins</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 11/20/2020 - 09:22</span> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/blog/public/blog/Ros%20speaking.jpg?itok=P8S2VPg5" width="265" height="177" alt="Ros Miller" title="Ros Miller" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-blog" /> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>My daughter Jillian was first diagnosed with lung cancer when she was 28 years old. She thought it was just a swollen lymph node – a residual from a cold. Her lung cancer diagnosis came while we were sitting in a drab exam room, hoping that she had thyroid cancer. It ended up being stage IV non-small cell lung cancer.</p> <p>At the time of her diagnosis, she had been out of the house for 10 years. She was financially secure with a stable career. She didn’t have a curfew, she didn’t have to answer to anyone, and she could come and go as she pleased. Suddenly, this changed overnight with her diagnosis.</p> <p>Becoming a caregiver for your adult child is a hard pill to swallow. What do you say? How do you say it? Are you being intrusive? Are you giving them enough space? Are you taking away their independence? Treating them like a baby? Making all the decisions for them?</p> <p>When she moved back in with us, we still wanted her to feel independent. It was important to try to keep her in charge. She kept the schedule and told us where she needed to be and when (even though I was at all her appointments, keeping my own calendar, and taking notes). Before an appointment, I would ask her if it was okay if I asked the doctor questions. We tried our best to make her feel autonomous, and she did her best to let us think she was falling for it.</p> <p>Throughout all her treatment, she kept paying of her bills: rent, utilities, car payments, and insurance. We just couldn’t give up the hope that one day she would need to drive her car again. One of the hardest conversations we had was when I had to talk to her about getting her personal affairs in order. It was heart-wrenching to take her the family lawyer and help her get a will.</p> <p>Jill wanted to do anything and everything that she could to live. Even at the end, she wanted to live. Whatever it took, she was willing to do. If doctors said, stand on your head, she would’ve found a way to stand on her head. Jillian was always hopeful, and I was too. Something we were going to do might not fix it, but it would carry her to the next best thing to come along.</p> <p>Jillian being diagnosed with lung cancer floored people, including her team of doctors at the cancer center. They just didn’t normally see someone with such an advanced disease at 28.  Jillian was treated with radiation, chemo, and cyber knife on the lesions in her brain. This was in 2012, so she was only tested for the major gene mutations at the time (ALK, EGFR, and KRAS), but tested negative. While she eventually tested positive for ROS1, there were no drugs approved at the time and, by the time she they found the mutation, her liver was too damaged to qualify to go on a targeted therapy.</p> <p>The chemo did shrink her tumors, but eventually, she became so sick that she couldn’t continue on any kind of treatment. Choosing to enter hospice was a difficult decision for her because she wasn’t giving up. The hospice coordinator explained that she could continue with medicine and treatments up until she said no. They would support her with whatever decision and the only reason they would stop her care is if she was told there was a cure and she qualified or if she didn’t want to continue with hospice.</p> <p>She passed away in May 2013, less than a year after being diagnosed. After she passed, about a month went by, and life started going back to normal. It was almost like she wasn’t gone, just back home in Miami. My husband went back to work and our other kids went home. And I was stuck at home. I was angry, hurt, and frustrated. I needed something to do. I wanted to change people’s perception about lung cancer.</p> <p>People always ask me: did she smoke? At first, that question made me furious. It took me a long time to come to terms with the fact that responding angrily was not helping. Instead, I now say, “I’m glad you asked that question. It has nothing to do with smoking. She was a never smoker, but that doesn’t matter; she shouldn’t be judged on how or why she got the disease. She was diagnosed with a terminal disease and it is a tragedy that it took her too soon.”</p> <p>You didn’t see 28-year-olds on billboards with lung cancer. Stories were the same: “I got lung cancer because I smoked.” I needed desperately to get on a soap box and use a megaphone to say “ANYONE CAN GET THIS DISEASE.” With her passing, I found that my passion was in helping to raise awareness about lung cancer for other people.</p> <p>Through my advocacy, I found a voice and determination in me that I didn’t know I had. I got more confident in speaking out and sharing my story. I didn’t want to be the person that lost her child and couldn’t do anything about it. I wanted to be the person who walked in the room, and they knew I had done an awful lot because my daughter gave her the faith and determination that she could make a difference.</p> <p>For someone interested in getting involved in advocacy, you don’t have to be expert; all you need is passion. You just need to want to make a difference. Remember, you are not a number; you are a person who has something valuable to say. If you don’t know where to start, check-out advocacy organizations; most have tips and tools to get you started. You don’t have to look too hard to find a path to get involved. Even if it’s as small as writing letter, you can make a difference.</p> <p>While it will never change our circumstances, what we knew, and when we knew it, lung cancer advocacy helps something good come out of something bad.  That’s why, years later, I’m still involved in lung cancer community.</p> <p>There is so much more that can be done. She died 7 years ago. But in 7 years, 17 new drugs have come out. And we’re just on the cusp. People are thinking in novel ways about how to approach lung cancer. I find it inspiring, hopeful, encouraging, and motivating. If that’s what we could do with the little amount of money we have, what could we do with more money for more research? How much faster would that move discoveries and thoughts to treatment options and treatments? It boggles the mind.</p> <p class="rtecenter"><strong>Interested in learning more about lung cancer advocacy? We have the tools to help you get started.  Join the <a href="https://lungevity.org/for-supporters-advocates/lungevity-action-network">LUNGevity Action Network </a>to take real steps towards improving lives and outcomes for people with lung cancer.</strong></p> <p class="rtecenter"><a class="alt-button" href="https://lungevity.org/for-supporters-advocates/lungevity-action-network">Join Now</a></p> <hr /> <p><img alt="Ros Miller" class="display-left" src="/sites/default/files/blog/Ros%20headshot.jpg" title="Ros Miller" />Ros Miller is wife, mother, advocate. Ros is a military spouse(retired), and gained many skills while exploring different jobs from cook to Girl Scout Cookie mom, substitute teacher, volunteer coordinator, administrative assistant and various nonprofit board positions. Today, Ros is a staunch advocate for lung cancer to help educate, raise awareness, fundraise for lung cancer research as Founder of <a href="https://jilliansdream.org/">Jillian's Dream</a> and Executive Director of <a href="https://www.preludetoacure.com/">Prelude to a Cure</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog category</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/from-community" hreflang="en">From the community</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/caregiving" hreflang="en">-&gt; Caregiving</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/diagnosed-under-50" hreflang="en">-&gt; Diagnosed under 50</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/get-involved" hreflang="en">-&gt; Get involved</a></div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-comment-node-blog field--type-comment field--label-hidden comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=5317&amp;2=comment_node_blog&amp;3=comment_node_blog" token="EWwVTJBMZSxRWou3qXjXWADxVW8qprErccpYZHC-87s"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 20 Nov 2020 15:22:21 +0000 khaskins 5317 at https://www.lungevity.org https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/finding-my-passion-in-lung-cancer-advocacy#comments Finding Your LifeLine https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/finding-your-lifeline <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Finding Your LifeLine</span> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">LUNGevity Foundation</div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/khaskins" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">khaskins</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 11/06/2020 - 09:01</span> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/blog/public/blog/Sarah%20and%20Pat_0.png?itok=26yJwe7i" width="265" height="134" alt="Sarah (left) and Pat (right)" title="Sarah (left) and Pat (right)" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-blog" /> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>A lung cancer diagnosis can be overwhelming. Support from family and friends becomes a crucial part of navigating the disease. Equally as important to many is support and understanding from someone who has already walked the lung cancer path.</p> <p>Finding someone who understands what you’re going through isn’t always easy, however. That’s why LUNGevity created the LifeLine Support Program.</p> <p>We sat down with Sarah (mentor) and Pat (mentee) to learn more about their experience with LifeLine and how it has improved their lung cancer journey.  </p> <p> </p> <p class="question"><strong>Describe what LifeLine is in your own words.</strong></p> <p class="answer"><strong>Sarah</strong>: LifeLine is a LUNGevity program that matches lung cancer survivors who are willing to share their experience with newly diagnosed patients or others who could use some support.  </p> <p class="answer"><strong>Pat</strong>: It is just that: a lifeline. Typically, after reaching out to Sarah with news about my cancer, or everyday life, I know I am not alone. Cancer not only affects your body; it interrupts life as you have known it.  </p> <p> </p> <p class="question"><strong>Why did you decide to get involved with the Lifeline Program?</strong></p> <p class="answer"><strong>Sarah</strong>: I decided to get involved with the LifeLine Program after I had a little time as a patient under my belt and felt as though I had something to offer to other patients.  I’m proud of the way I’ve been able to find my way to living with my diagnosis without letting it take away all the joy in my life, and I hoped to be able to provide some perspective on that to someone who was struggling.  Also, I know how invaluable the connection with someone “in the same boat” can be and wanted be there for someone who needed that connection.</p> <p class="answer"><strong>Pat</strong>: Although my family was and is very supportive, I knew I needed to speak with someone who really understood my ups and downs while dealing with cancer.  </p> <p> </p> <p class="question"><strong>How did you feel about being matched with each other?</strong></p> <p class="answer"><strong>Sarah</strong>: I was happy to be matched with someone with whom I share many similarities, in and out of our cancer journeys, as well as many interesting differences.  We never lack for things to chat about, whether it be scans and appointments or family news and pastimes.</p> <p class="answer"><strong>Pat</strong>: I had never reached out to anyone in this way so I wasn’t sure what to expect.  However, the “match” has worked out wonderfully.  </p> <p> </p> <p class="question"><strong>What would you tell someone who is thinking about getting involved?</strong></p> <p class="answer"><strong>Sarah</strong>: I would tell anyone who is thinking about getting involved that this program has the potential to enrich your lives in ways you couldn’t imagine.  There’s a real joy to finding a personal email among the utility bills and assorted junk in one’s inbox - I always look forward to hearing how Pat is doing and what she’s been up to. I signed up as a mentor, but our relationship has evolved into one of true mutual support and friendship.</p> <p class="answer"><strong>Pat</strong>: Each person is different, but I would say, go for it. One never knows until one tries.  </p> <p> </p> <p class="question"><strong>Final thoughts?</strong></p> <p class="answer"><strong>Sarah</strong>: My friendship with Pat began shortly before the COVID-19 pandemic threw the world into uncharted waters.  In fact, before travel began shutting down, we talked about how much fun it would be to meet in person someday.  Of course that hasn’t happened yet, due to circumstances out of our control, but we still hope to have that chance.  In the meantime, it has been a real gift to be able to weather both cancer AND a global pandemic with a new friend.</p> <p class="answer"><strong>Pat</strong>: My communications with Sarah have evolved into a great friendship.  We had planned to meet face-to-face just when COVID-19 mushroomed. We are still planning to do so at some point and I am very much looking forward to it. I feel Sarah has been able to pull me out of the depths of despair and has provided hope while living in my new world of uncertainty.  <br />  </p> <p><img alt="" class="display-left" src="/sites/default/files/blog/LifelineSupportPartnerslogo-Final_0.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>More about LifeLine: </strong>LifeLine matches lung cancer patients or caregivers with support partners based on factors including gender and type of lung cancer. Support mentors offer encouragement, advice, experience, and hope to those newly diagnosed and anyone needing additional support through a one-on-one personal connection by email or telephone. Are you interested in becoming a mentor or mentee?</p> <p class="rtecenter"><a class="alt-button" href="https://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/support-services/peer-to-peer-mentoring/lungevity-lifeline">Learn more</a></p> <h3>Related Reading:</h3> <ul> <li><a href="https://lungevity.org/news-blogs/blogs/resource-highlight-lung-cancer-helpline">Resource Highlight: Lung Cancer HELPLine</a></li> <li><a href="https://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/support-services">LUNGevity Support Services</a></li> <li><a href="https://lungevity.org/for-patients-caregivers/lung-cancer-101">Lung Cancer 101</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog category</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/from-community" hreflang="en">From the community</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/get-involved" hreflang="en">-&gt; Get involved</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog-categories/survivorship" hreflang="en">-&gt; Survivorship</a></div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-comment-node-blog field--type-comment field--label-hidden comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=5301&amp;2=comment_node_blog&amp;3=comment_node_blog" token="8nP8r0Iah6mz9gp9s452DvAWEO97l1q172Cw15Lqy_0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 06 Nov 2020 15:01:25 +0000 khaskins 5301 at https://www.lungevity.org https://www.lungevity.org/blogs/finding-your-lifeline#comments