Anyone can get lung cancer

  • One in 17 people in the US will be diagnosed with lung cancer in their lifetime.1
  • More than 236,000 people in the US will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year, with a new diagnosis every 2.2 minutes.1
  • It is estimated that close to 65% of all new lung cancer diagnoses are among people who have never smoked or are former smokers.2
  • About 12% of new lung cancer cases are among never-smokers.2

We need to get better at finding and treating lung cancer

  • Lung cancer accounts for 12% of all new cancer diagnoses but 21% of all cancer deaths.1
  • Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, regardless of gender or ethnicity, taking about 150,000 American lives each year.1
  • More lives are lost to lung cancer than to colorectal and pancreatic cancers combined.1
  • Lung cancer has been the leading cancer killer of women since 1987, killing almost 1.4 times as many women as breast cancer.1,3
  • Only 23% of all people diagnosed with lung cancer will survive 5 years or more, BUT if it’s caught before it spreads, the chance for 5-year survival improves dramatically.1

Lung cancer research needs investment that matches the impact of the disease

  • Only 6% of federal government dollars spent on cancer research are spent on lung cancer research.4

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Lung Cancer Facts, part 1lung cancer facts


References

  1. Cancer statistics: NIH National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results website, https://seer.cancer.gov, released April 15, 2022. 
  2. Siegal DA, et al. Proportion of never smokers among men and women with lung cancer in 7 US states. JAMA Oncol. 2021 Feb 1; 7(2): 302-304. doi: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.6362.
  3.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Health Statistics. CDC WONDER On-line Database, compiled from Compressed Mortality File 1999-2014 Series 20 No. 2T, 2016.
  4.  Estimates of Funding for Various Research, Condition, and Disease Categories (RCDC). National Institutes of Health website. https://report.nih.gov/categorical_spending#/. Table published June 25, 2021. Accessed April 16, 2022.

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